GUNJAN
MFA, HISTORY OF ART
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I've always wondered about the dynamics playing along the attempts when we replicate a self-portrait made by a person who lived many years ago.

What am I trying to capture exactly?

While the artist clearly wanted to capture their self, the expressions playing along as they drew, and the way they perceived themselves being imposed upon the world to view, our own attempts seem to be an acceptance of the imposition by the artist as they wanted us to know them.

I have come to understand that the self-portraits of the artists I replicate are everything and nothing like their own. So maybe, they weren't as successful in leaving the imposition behind. Because all of us, in our own ways, will perceive only what we want to.

My threads play along the dynamics of past and present when I decide to recreate a masterpiece, specifically a self-portrait. The medium is highly liberating, and the medium gels exceptionally well with the miniature sizes I work on. Working on small sizes help me understand the details that went into a masterpiece better. The threads take over the space once painted over years ago by brushes and fingers. The replication tends to be rewarding as my understanding of the artist increases and their perspectives suddenly seem to be my own, with each piece making me feel like I have lived another’s life, through their eyes, even if it was for a few days.

WORKS

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